1. Posted on 14 March, 2013

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    Reblogged from kat-chow

    nprkat:

    “I could also feel the way people wanted me to fit into an idea of the type of Asian male they were comfortable with. Both sides made it hard to be myself. I was often described as quiet, studious, easygoing, book-smart but not street-smart, and some of these descriptions stuck in a self-fulfilling way. It took me much of my life to realize that I was molding myself to a stereotype.” 

  2. Posted by: kat-chow
  3. AsianAmerican

    identity

    PSY

  1. 

Dinh Q. Lê has always felt a part of his life was missing. He was 10 years old the night that he and his family fled the Khmer Rouge-occupied border town of Ha Tien in Vietnam in 1978. They left everything behind, including family photographs.
Mr. Lê, now 44 and a prominent artist – he was the first Vietnamese name to hold a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York – spent almost a year in a Thai refugee camp before being repatriated to Los Angeles. He has since relocated to Ho Chi Minh City, where for the past 15 years he has collected discarded black-and-white snapshots sold in large quantities at antique stores in the city.
“A part of me is hoping that when my family escaped, these photos were saved and somehow left in these shops,” he says.


Read more here. View in High-Res

    Dinh Q. Lê has always felt a part of his life was missing. He was 10 years old the night that he and his family fled the Khmer Rouge-occupied border town of Ha Tien in Vietnam in 1978. They left everything behind, including family photographs.

    Mr. Lê, now 44 and a prominent artist – he was the first Vietnamese name to hold a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York – spent almost a year in a Thai refugee camp before being repatriated to Los Angeles. He has since relocated to Ho Chi Minh City, where for the past 15 years he has collected discarded black-and-white snapshots sold in large quantities at antique stores in the city.

    “A part of me is hoping that when my family escaped, these photos were saved and somehow left in these shops,” he says.

    Read more here.

  2. Posted by: lamthuyvo
  3. Art

    Identity

    Vietnam

  1. 
"I absolutely challenge the White-Black dichotomy that mostly defines the racial politics in this country. At first glance, people see my pale skin, kinky-curly blonde afro, and green eyes and they either think I’m biracial or are otherwise utterly intrigued. In my adult years, I am rarely asked overtly about my racial background, but I can sense the uncertainty that surrounds with my identity. I can feel them subtly asking through their stares. On occasion, I have met people who have encountered others with albinism or can recognize that I am black but most people don’t know what to make of me. How do I expect people to know about albinism when it is practically invisible in this society? It is rarely discussed, unless it is in reference to animals or in a biological context. In addition, whenever a character with albinism appears in the media, he or she is usually depicted negatively such as an evil character or having supernatural powers."
-Brandi M. Green,  Embracing the Exotic, Being a Black Woman With Albinism, Clutch Magazine

Click through to read the rest of this fascinating post on identity.
-John A. View in High-Res

    "I absolutely challenge the White-Black dichotomy that mostly defines the racial politics in this country. At first glance, people see my pale skin, kinky-curly blonde afro, and green eyes and they either think I’m biracial or are otherwise utterly intrigued. In my adult years, I am rarely asked overtly about my racial background, but I can sense the uncertainty that surrounds with my identity. I can feel them subtly asking through their stares. On occasion, I have met people who have encountered others with albinism or can recognize that I am black but most people don’t know what to make of me. How do I expect people to know about albinism when it is practically invisible in this society? It is rarely discussed, unless it is in reference to animals or in a biological context. In addition, whenever a character with albinism appears in the media, he or she is usually depicted negatively such as an evil character or having supernatural powers."

    -Brandi M. Green,  Embracing the Exotic, Being a Black Woman With Albinism, Clutch Magazine

    Click through to read the rest of this fascinating post on identity.

    -John A.

  2. Posted by: oldmanasante
  3. albinism

    black

    black woman

    identity

    race