1. Affirmative action programs like UT’s admissions policy don’t tilt the playing field in favor of minority candidates; they return the already-tilted field to level ground. As far as I’m concerned, Ms. Fisher and I are unfortunate but inevitable casualties in the morally justifiable struggle for equal opportunity. I’m okay with that, because my denial by UT was the first time that things didn’t roll my way, and it was about damn time.

    UT student Peter Stroud defends affirmative action in this thoughtful essay, even though he says the policy might have actually resulted in his rejection fromthe University of Texas the first time he applied.

  2. Posted by: samsandersnpr
  3. affirmative action

    University of Texas

    Supreme Court

    racism

    quotas

    race

    diversity

    college admissions

  1. Friday Night Lights and The Wire both offered intelligent, thoughtful portraits of race. For laughs, we’ve still got the smart and subtle humor of NBC’s Community, FX’s Louie, and Comedy Central’s Key & Peele. But in what is supposedly a new age of groundbreaking, “novelistic” television drama, one of the most dramatic threads of America’s cultural history is strangely absent. We did Mad Men, the well-lit, glossy “before” picture of white America, taken just as the civil rights movement was about to upend Madison Avenue’s cushy status quo. And we’ve done The Wire, the gritty “after” shot of urban America in the wake of white flight and the drug war. But we skipped the middle chapter. We haven’t done the part about how America stopped being Mad Men and turned into The Wire. That would be the story of the failure of racial integration in the 1970s.

    — 

    Dear HBO, There is a television series you need to make…”

    —Tanner Colby, for Slate

  2. Posted by: samsandersnpr
  3. race

    integration

    segregation

    slate

    hbo

    mad men

    the wire

    diversity

  1. "Black & White In Mayberry"
“Our conversation slipped into reminiscences of all the all-white shows we have known, and whether we are better off with showrunners pretending that people of color didn’t exist. “Bonanza” and “Gunsmoke”—other much-loved staples of that era in our household—would occasionally take a crack at edgier storylines involving race or gender. At best they were ham-fisted; at worst, downright racist.
All-white can sometimes be all right: “The Andy Griffith Show” didn’t have a chance to be particularly racist because it didn’t try for anything beyond sweet simplicity.”
—Shani O. Hilton, The Awl

    "Black & White In Mayberry"

    Our conversation slipped into reminiscences of all the all-white shows we have known, and whether we are better off with showrunners pretending that people of color didn’t exist. “Bonanza” and “Gunsmoke”—other much-loved staples of that era in our household—would occasionally take a crack at edgier storylines involving race or gender. At best they were ham-fisted; at worst, downright racist.

    All-white can sometimes be all right: “The Andy Griffith Show” didn’t have a chance to be particularly racist because it didn’t try for anything beyond sweet simplicity.”

    —Shani O. Hilton, The Awl

  2. Posted by: samsandersnpr
  3. andy griffith

    diversity

    mayberry

    race

    sitcoms

    tv

    andy griffith show

  1. Before we had Jessamyn, we didn’t have any women,” says Mike Herrick, Urban Airship’s vice president of engineering. “We didn’t have any diversity at all—it was all a bunch of white men. While we were still a success as a company, there was definitely something lacking…. Software is a creative pursuit and an art form. Diversity makes it happen better.

    — 

    An interesting article about the gender diversity (or lack therof) of the startup scene in Portland. (via @LindseyK).

    Also interesting to note - Willamette Week included this disclaimer at the bottom: FULL DISCLOSURE: 35 percent of Willamette Weeks employees are women, including 22 percent in the news room.”

    -Kate Myers

    (Source: wweek.com)

  2. Posted by: joncephine
  3. tech

    women

    startup

    diversity