1. Cal State’s campaign for more black students yields gains

    Officials from California State University say their outreach to potential black students has helped drive a 6 percent gain in applicants this past year. Top university officials traveled to different African American church congregations as part of this initiative. And this year, folks from the university expect to visit more than 100 churches in the state and reach more than 100,000 people. 

    The article says California’s “demographic shifts” make it so that universities have to work “harder” to attract blacks, Latinos and other underrepresented students. 

    Here are California State’s demographics, according to College Board:

    image

  2. Posted by: katelinchow1
  3. LA Times

    education

    college admissions

  1. At Mission High, the struggling school she’d chosen against the advice of her friends and relatives, Maria earned high grades in math and some days caught herself speaking English even with her Spanish-speaking teachers. By 11th grade, she wrote long papers on complex topics like desegregation and the war in Iraq. She became addicted to winning debates in class, despite her shyness and heavy accent. In her junior year, she became the go-to translator and advocate for her mother, her aunts, and for other Latino kids at school. In March, Maria and her teachers were celebrating acceptance letters to five colleges and two prestigious scholarships, including one from Dave Eggers’ writing center, 826 Valencia.

    But on the big state tests—the days-long multiple-choice exams that students in California take once a year—Maria scored poorly. And these standardized tests, she understood, were how her school was graded. According to the scores, Mission High is among the lowest-performing 5 percent of schools in the country, and it has consistently failed to meet the ever-rising benchmarks set by the federal No Child Left Behind Act. The law mandates universal “proficiency” in math and reading by 2014—a deadline that weighs heavily on educators around the nation, since schools that don’t meet it face stiff penalties.

    — Kristina Rizga of Mother Jones offers a fascinating, surprising look inside one school in California where she spent 18 months reporting. A lot of interesting issues are raised in this one.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. education

    immigration

  1. Black people need not be insulated from their harsh realities, but many of the reported figures and statistics about black people are poorly sourced, outdated, out of context and not factual.

    — Black Education Statistics: Separating Fact From Fiction (via tballardbrown)

  2. Posted by: tballardbrown
  3. education

    statistics

  1. Posted on 13 June, 2012

    120 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from tballardbrown

    tballardbrown:

    When a student who won a scholarship for African-American students walked to the stage at a Riverside, Calif., high school to pick up his award, the audience laughed nervously. The student, Jeffrey Warren, was white.

  2. Posted by: tballardbrown
  3. education

    scholarship

    race

  1. Posted on 6 June, 2012

    100 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from longreads

    This is a good read. — tanya b
longreads:

How a semiliterate University of Memphis football player educated himself while facing countless obstacles:

You can’t hide for long in college when you’re semiliterate. But somehow Mr. Cathey slipped through his freshman year with just under a C average, taking classes like elementary algebra and music appreciation. Then he saw the syllabus for HIST 2010: U.S. to 1877, his sophomore history class. How would he ever finish five books in four months?
He knew there was only one way: He had to go back to the beginning.
After practice every night, he would close the door to his room in the Carpenter Complex, reach under his bed, and pull out his 10 learn-to-read books. Twenty minutes, he thought, looking down at his watch. I’ve got to beat 20.

“The Education of Dasmine Cathey.” — Brad Wolverton, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Photos: Lance Murphey
More from the Chronicle

    This is a good read. — tanya b

    longreads:

    How a semiliterate University of Memphis football player educated himself while facing countless obstacles:

    You can’t hide for long in college when you’re semiliterate. But somehow Mr. Cathey slipped through his freshman year with just under a C average, taking classes like elementary algebra and music appreciation. Then he saw the syllabus for HIST 2010: U.S. to 1877, his sophomore history class. How would he ever finish five books in four months?

    He knew there was only one way: He had to go back to the beginning.

    After practice every night, he would close the door to his room in the Carpenter Complex, reach under his bed, and pull out his 10 learn-to-read books. Twenty minutes, he thought, looking down at his watch. I’ve got to beat 20.

    “The Education of Dasmine Cathey.” — Brad Wolverton, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Photos: Lance Murphey

    More from the Chronicle

  2. Posted by: tballardbrown
  3. education

  1. At the university’s five most competitive four-year colleges — Baruch, Brooklyn, City, Hunter and Queens — nearly 12 percent of freshmen entering in 2001 had SAT scores of 1,200 or more. In 2007, for the last prerecession class, the figure was up to 16 percent, and by last fall, it had jumped to 26 percent.

    At the same time, black representation among first-time freshmen at those colleges dropped, to 10 percent last fall from 17 percent in 2001. Over the same period, the Hispanic share rose slightly for several years, then fell once the recession began, to 18 percent, while the white portion fell slightly, to 35 percent.

    Asians are now entering the top colleges in the greatest numbers, composing 37 percent of those classes, up from 25 percent a decade earlier.

    — 

    "At CUNY, stricter admissions bring ethnic shift," NY Times.

    - MT

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. education

  1. Terrific story.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. brian resnick

    memphis

    education

    wesley carter

    darius hooker