1. Cooking is one of the main ways that mainstream US culture has sought to understand Asian-ness,” says Kent Ono of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, who teaches a course on Asian Americans in food media. “One can consume it in one’s home, without Asians present. One can watch a TV show and not have to engage with Asian Americans.” But in those other arenas, Ono notes, the opportunity to comfortably inhabit one’s Asian heritage is blocked by the submissive stereotype – both for men and women. Far more eloquent writers have covered the limitations of Asianness better than I could, but one thing remains true: as Ono states, “It is a very powerful stereotype and it’s very, very derogatory and has tremendously negative impacts on Asian-American communities.

    — Over at the Braiser, Tina Nguyen asks, "Is media coverage of Asian-American chefs a good thing?"

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. food

  1. [Korean-American chef Roy] Choi is part of a tsunami of rule-breaking Asian American chefs who have created a new genre of cooking in America: a robust and astonishingly creative blend that draws on Asian, Latin, and Southern foods. Its growing ranks of practitioners bring sterling chef credentials and modernist cooking techniques to bear on the foods of their forebears.

    What they’re making is not just “modernist” Asian cuisine. It’s a type of cooking that has filtered through the multiethnic influences of their upbringings: taco stands, fast food joints, barbecue shacks, hip hop, and graffiti. Theirs is not the “fusion” cooking of the late ’70s and ‘80’s, effete creations of European-trained masters who melded cultures with delicacy and nuance. Nor is it the cooking of Nobu Matsuhisa or Martin Yan, talented newcomers who tutored America in Asian ingredients and flavor combinations. This new wave of chefs is dishing up what I call Asian Soul Food: a gutsy, high-low mash up of street food and haute cuisine, old country flavors and new-fangled cooking techniques.

    — 

    "Stinky, Spicy, and Delicious: The Radical Reinvention of Asian American Food," by Nancy Matsumoto for the Atlantic.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. food

  1. On the season finale of NBC’s Who Do You Think You Are, Paula Deen discovered that her great great great great-grandfather, John Batts, was a slave owner. Deen, who was born, raised and still lives in Georgia, found that Batts, a politician and plantation owner, was very wealthy — and a hefty portion of his assets were slaves.

    — NBC via Gawker

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. food

    slavery

    television