1. Seeing this video - “Wut” by Le1f - everywhere. Here’s a Newsweek/Daily Beast interview with the artist.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. le1f

    wut

    music

    hip-hop

    sexuality

  1. A few minutes before my reading, store employee Marshall popped in my CD. Not 30 seconds into my go-go playlist, a white woman went to the cashier to complain. The song in question wasn’t even a go-go song. It was Parliament’s 1970s funk classic “Chocolate City”—a song that took on a moniker that was being used by Washingtonians celebrating the city’s first elected mayor, a black man named Walter Washington: ‘What’s happening, C.C. They still call in the White House, but that’s a temporary condition…’ The blonde woman marched straight to the cashier, who referred her to the owner of Politics & Prose. She said the music was “racist” and demanded they stop playing it. I am so very sad to report that the store actually complied.

    — Go-Go Live: Banned in Chevy Chase | Natalie Hopkinson (via tballardbrown)

  2. Posted by: tballardbrown
  3. go-go

    chuck brown

    music

    race

  1. atane:

nigeriancoverproject:

The Jazz Epistles - Jazz Epistles Verse 1

In the late 50s and early 60s, there was a healthy cultural exchange between African Americans and Africans. As far back as the late 50s and early 60s, bebop and hard bop jazz groups were forming all over Africa. One such group was The Jazz Epistles in South Africa. Think of them as a South African version of Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. The group included a young Hugh Masekela.
Full line up below
Piano: Dollar Brand (Abdullah Ibrahim), Trombone: Jonas Gwangwa, Trumpet: Hugh Masekela, Alto Sax, Clarinet: Kippie Moeketsi, Bass: Johnny Gertze, Drums: Makaya Ntshoko
View in High-Res

    atane:

    nigeriancoverproject:

    The Jazz Epistles - Jazz Epistles Verse 1

    In the late 50s and early 60s, there was a healthy cultural exchange between African Americans and Africans. As far back as the late 50s and early 60s, bebop and hard bop jazz groups were forming all over Africa. One such group was The Jazz Epistles in South Africa. Think of them as a South African version of Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers. The group included a young Hugh Masekela.

    Full line up below

    Piano: Dollar Brand (Abdullah Ibrahim), Trombone: Jonas Gwangwa, Trumpet: Hugh Masekela, Alto Sax, Clarinet: Kippie Moeketsi, Bass: Johnny Gertze, Drums: Makaya Ntshoko

  2. Posted by: tballardbrown
  3. jazz

    music

  1. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  2. rembert browne

    grantland

    music

    bet

  1. But there’s a competing narrative surrounding go-go, one that’s espoused by local law enforcement, some gentrifiers, and developers looking to convert D.C. into a mini Manhattan. They see the music as a problem; publicly, the talk is about crime surrounding go-go gatherings. “It’s this go-go,” one Metropolitan Police Department officer said during a 2005 hearing over nightclub violence. “If you have a black-tie event, you don’t have any problem. But if you bring go-go in, you’re going to have problems.” In 2010, the Washington City Paper reported that D.C. cops had taken to circulating a secret “go-go report” to keep tabs on the scene. And as DCentric.com’s Elahe Izadi wrote last year, “For many years now, go-go venues have been shut down inside D.C. due to club violence and liability issues, pushing the music further out into the Maryland suburbs like Prince George’s and Charles counties. Meanwhile punk rock, another D.C. musical mainstay, is not experiencing the same bad luck.”

    Assaults like these from the establishment are all the more potent given go-go’s insularity. Hip-hop, jazz, and blues were all at one point associated solely with violence and working-class black culture as well. Unlike those genres, though, go-go never went global other than when, in 1988, Spike Lee featured EU’s song “Da Butt" in School Daze. Go-go’s only ever been big business for the local black entrepreneurs in D.C. who kept it among themselves and guarded it fiercely.

    — "How Washington, D.C. Turned Its Back on Go-Go, the Music It Invented," Abdul Ali, The Atlantic.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. music

    go-go

    washingtondc

  1. Posted on 13 June, 2012

    246 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from tballardbrown

    tballardbrown:

    “What I love about this is how well someone who is widely considered to be the antithesis of cool can slide back in and completely own something as culturally approved as the contemporary standard that is Rolling in the Deep.” — Céline Dion Covers Adele’s ‘Rolling in the Deep,’ Kills It, Of Course 

  2. Posted by: tballardbrown
  3. rolling in the deep

    celine dion

    adele

    music

  1. Bobby Womack is BACK!!

    Bobby Womack's new album, The Bravest Man in the Universe, comes out June 12.

    My beloved maternal grandmother and Godmother loved Mr. Bobby Womack. So, I’m happy to see he’s back with a new album this month. The soulful crooner is known for hits like “Across 110th Street” and “If You Think You’re Lonely Now.”

    NPR’s Music has a first listen of the album, “The Bravest Man In The Universe.” http://www.npr.org/2012/06/03/154085803/first-listen-bobby-womack-the-bravest-man-in-the-universe#playlist  -CA

  2. Posted by: msworld365
  3. NPR MUSIC

    BOBBY WOMACK

    THE BRAVEST MAN IN THE UNIVERSE

    R&B

    MUSIC

    SOUL

  1. Posted on 6 June, 2012

    207 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from tballardbrown

    That’s funked up! — tanya b. 
tballardbrown:

Funk pioneer George Clinton is on a mission to win back the rights to some of his best-known work from the 1970s and ’80s. It’s a situation many artists have found themselves in — partly because of the complicated copyright laws that govern their work.  (via George Clinton Fights For His Right To Funk : The Record : NPR)
Photo credit: William Thoren
View in High-Res

    That’s funked up! — tanya b. 

    tballardbrown:

    Funk pioneer George Clinton is on a mission to win back the rights to some of his best-known work from the 1970s and ’80s. It’s a situation many artists have found themselves in — partly because of the complicated copyright laws that govern their work.  (via George Clinton Fights For His Right To Funk : The Record : NPR)

    Photo credit: William Thoren

  2. Posted by: tballardbrown
  3. Parliament

    Funkadelic

    George Clinton

    music

  1. Informed by meetings with top physicists and cosmologists at MIT and Cornell University, “Dark Matter” is intended to be the first in a series of albums that [Wu-Tang Clan founding member] GZA—born Gary Grice in Brooklyn in 1966—will put out in the next few years, several of which are designed to get a wide audience hooked on science. …

    "There’s no parental advisory, no profanity, no nudity," he said. "The only thing that’s going to be stripped bare is the planets."

    —  “A rapper finds his muse in the stars,” Anna Louie Sussman, WSJ. (MT, via @jawkneesee)

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. wu-tang clan

    gza

    music

  1. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  2. music

    chuck brown

    go-go

    shani hilton