1. 
"…numbers encapsulate the problem facing English-language television executives and advertisers: they desperately want to appeal to the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States (about three-quarters speak Spanish), especially those who are young, bilingual and bicultural, but those viewers seem to want very little to do with American English-language television.
They do, however, continue to watch Spanish-language networks in huge numbers. In May, on the final night of the most recent season of “Modern Family,” far more Hispanic viewers were watching the top Spanish language show that week, the telenovela “La Que No Podía Amar,” on Univision, which attracted 5.2 million viewers.”
“Networks Struggle to Appeal to Hispanics" — Tanzina Vega and Bill Carter, The New York Times

Interesting piece on the challenges and opportunities facing networks as they try to reach out to Latinos. Personally, I wouldn’t mind seeing a primetime Spanish-language telenovela on one of the big three… But that’s just me. — Sam View in High-Res

    "…numbers encapsulate the problem facing English-language television executives and advertisers: they desperately want to appeal to the more than 50 million Latinos in the United States (about three-quarters speak Spanish), especially those who are young, bilingual and bicultural, but those viewers seem to want very little to do with American English-language television.

    They do, however, continue to watch Spanish-language networks in huge numbers. In May, on the final night of the most recent season of “Modern Family,” far more Hispanic viewers were watching the top Spanish language show that week, the telenovela “La Que No Podía Amar,” on Univision, which attracted 5.2 million viewers.”

    Networks Struggle to Appeal to Hispanics" — Tanzina Vega and Bill Carter, The New York Times

    Interesting piece on the challenges and opportunities facing networks as they try to reach out to Latinos. Personally, I wouldn’t mind seeing a primetime Spanish-language telenovela on one of the big three… But that’s just me. — Sam

  2. Posted by: samsandersnpr
  3. Sophia Vergara

    Latinos

    television

    primetime

    Modern Family

  1. Hernan Lopez doesn’t look like a guy who produces telenovelas, the soap operas that dominate the airwaves throughout Latin America. He looks like a guy who stars in them. With his wavy black hair, firm jawline and velvety Argentinean accent, it’s easy to picture him galloping home on a white horse to rescue his childhood sweetheart from losing the family hacienda to a corrupt patrón.

    But Lopez has a different quest ahead of him. As CEO of Fox International Channels he’s the point person and prime mover behind News Corp.’s effort to capture an outsize slice of a $1 trillion pie: the surging U.S. Hispanic market. Standing in front of 900 ­potential advertisers at the Ziegfeld Theatre in ­Manhattan, as part of the annual upfronts, when TV networks spare no expense to showcase their upcoming offerings, he provides an early glimpse of ­MundoFox, a national ­Spanish-language broadcast television channel News Corp. is launching later this month.

    — "The Next Media Jackpot: The Fight For The $1 Trillion Hispanic Market," by Jeff Bercovici for Forbes.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. television

    news corp

    hernan lopez

  1. “High-impact” and “buzz-worthy” seem like apt terms to describe K-Town — now dubbed “the reality show no TV network could show you.” The show’s teaser trailer features epileptic flashes of castmembers bootyshaking in their lingerie, licking liquor off one anothers’ bodies, tongue-tangling and pelvis-grinding in various gender combinations and drunkenly punching each other senseless — in short, engaging in activities that are not commonly associated with Asian Americans in mainstream media.

    And that, says Mike Le, is the point.

    “I think we as Asians have a tendency to embrace our own ‘model minority’ hype,” he says. “To me, that one-dimensional, positive stereotype is as bad as the images in the mass media that depict us only as ninjas or dragon ladies or asexual IT guys. Yes, the interest in the show is Asians going wild — you better believe that when we took it around to the networks, the old white execs we showed it to were popping their eyes out. But in reality, K-Town’s about the fact that all the stereotypes, good or bad, don’t fit when you’re talking about real people. Our cast doesn’t represent all Asians. They simply represent themselves.”

    — "Tough times for Tiger Moms as Asian-America meets ‘Jersey Shore,’" Jeff Yang, WSJ.com.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. jeff yang

    k-town

    television

  1. Posted on 18 July, 2012

    258 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from racialicious

    My question was as follows:

    “One of the things I loved about Firefly was the exploration of the fusion of Asian and American cultures. Many Asian Americans go through a similar journey. I was wondering, if you were to explore that again in the future, if you would be willing to include Asian or Asian American performers?”

    If you’re surprised by my question, go back and watch Firefly again. Or read this xkcd comic, because Randall Munroe is apparently working on a relevant xkcd for every possible topic in the world, like Wikipedia in webcomic form. I’ve watched the show several times and I’m fairly certain that there isn’t more than 15 seconds of footage with an Asian person on screen.

    We’re virtually faceless, and completely voiceless, in a universe that is supposed to represent a Sino-American future.

    And the answer was:

    “Yeah, absolutely. It’s not a mission statement, in terms of who I’m casting for a particular thing. It was a mission statement of the show to say that cultures inevitably blend, even if it happens through conquest and violence.”

    This was a very nice, neutral answer. Joss gave a genuine, heartfelt response, and I appreciate that.

    But the answer still frustrated. Because it was clear that the notion of cultural integration was more important than the practice. That the grand vision of a mixed Asian/American tomorrow was more important than the inclusion of Asian faces and voices today.

    I wanted to grab the mic again.

    Here we see the intersection of both gendered and racial representation in media. Joss holds one to be a dear cause, to be integrated into the themes and characters of his stories.

    The other? Does not register as a priority.

    — Mike Le, “Frustrations Of An Asian American Whedonite,” Racebending 7/17/12. (via racialicious)

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. joss whedon

    firefly

    television

    movies

  1. (Warning: there’s bad language in that video.)

    Via Emily Yoshida at Grantland:

    This is K-Town, or as it’s perhaps more commonly referred to, “The Asian Jersey Shore.” You may or may not have heard of it, but if you cared at all about it when news of its potential existence surfaced back in 2010, it’s probably all flooding back now: the Weekend Update cheap shots (the culmination of a steady, thoroughly accidental hype amplification that started with the blog Angry Asian Man stumbling across the Craigslist casting call), the semi-homemade, "Tikk Tokk"–parodying sizzle reel, the eye-popping photos of former cast member and porn star Peter Le. Yes, that’s right, K-Town has been a supposed thing long enough to have already cycled through two cast members (Le and actress Jennifer Field have both been replaced since the show was first announced). It’s achieved an odd sort of buzz that has come and gone prior to the show actually taking any form at all.

    But producers Mike Le and Tyrese Gibson (yes, that Tyrese) are banking on the appeal of drunk, misbehavin’ Asians being evergreen enough to still pique interest. K-Town is now the flagship show for LOuD, the YouTube channel launched by Ben Silverman’s Electus production company, and after years of buildup, it finally premiers today. Electus’s hope is that show will be enough of a web hit to make the transition to TV a no-brainer — and hopefully make that transition more viable for future pilots and web series. They’ve also stacked the deck with some big-name reality producers (Laguna Beach and The Hills’masterminds Liz Gately and Tony DiSanto have executive producer credits). The “model minority” stereotype is still as ripe for dismantling as ever, and by some reckoning, K-Town's all-Asian-American cast (the first on any show if its kind) and their proclivity for spontaneous girl-on-girl bar fights could be just the thing to do it.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. k-town

    reality tv

    youtube

    television

  1. The Wire: The Musical with Michael Kenneth Williams. In the off chance you hadn’t seen it yet.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. the wire

    musical

    television

    funny

  1. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  2. community

    television

    geeks

  1. Apparently the whole UK knows the lyrics to the Fresh Prince theme song.

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. will smith

    fresh prince of bel aire

    music

    television

  1. On the season finale of NBC’s Who Do You Think You Are, Paula Deen discovered that her great great great great-grandfather, John Batts, was a slave owner. Deen, who was born, raised and still lives in Georgia, found that Batts, a politician and plantation owner, was very wealthy — and a hefty portion of his assets were slaves.

    — NBC via Gawker

  2. Posted by: mthompsnpr
  3. food

    slavery

    television